How to Replace a Light Switch – dummies

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    \r\n \t

  • \r\n

    The white (neutral) wire connects to the silver screw, or you place it in the back wire hole on the same side of the device as the silver screw.

    \r\n

  • \r\n \t

  • \r\n

    The black (hot) wire goes to the brass screw or into the hole in the back of the device on the same side as the brass screw. This wire is sometimes red.

    \r\n

  • \r\n \t

  • \r\n

    The green or bare copper (ground) wire, if the device has one, attaches to the green screw terminal on the switch or to the electrical box.

    \r\n

  • \r\n

\r\n

Although plug-in connections may be more convenient, they are less reliable than those with screw terminals, so don’t use them!

\r\n\r\n

Replacing single-pole light switches

\r\nIf the substitution has On and Off embossed on its body and it ‘s the entirely switch that controls lights or receptacles, it ‘s a single-pole trade. To replace this kind of switch, follow these steps : \r\n

    \r\n \t

  1. \r\n

    Turn off the power to the switch at the main circuit breaker or fuse panel.

    \r\n

  2. \r\n \t

  3. \r\n

    Unscrew and remove the switch plate; then use a voltage tester to make sure that the circuit is dead.

    \r\n

  4. \r\n \t

  5. \r\n

    Unscrew the switch from the electrical box and pull it out with the wires still attached.

    \r\n\"image1.jpg\"\r\n

    Two or three wires will be attached to the switch: an incoming hot wire, which is black; a return wire, which carries the load to the fixture and may be black, red, or any other color except green; and sometimes a grounding wire, which is green or bare copper. There may be other wires in the box, but you are only dealing with the ones connected directly to the switch.

    \r\n

    You may find a white wire that has black tape on it connected to the switch. This tape indicates that the white wire is being used as a black or colored wire in the switch leg, so it’s not neutral.

    \r\n

  6. \r\n \t

  7. \r\n

    Compare your new switch with the one you’re replacing to find the corresponding locations for the electrical screw connectors.

    \r\n

    Because the power is off, you can match up the connectors the easy way: Instead of disconnecting all the wires at once and possibly getting confused, unscrew and connect one wire at a time.

    \r\n

  8. \r\n \t

  9. \r\n

    Attach the first wire you unscrew to the same-colored screw on the new switch as it was on the old; do the same with the second.

    \r\n

    To connect a wire to a terminal, strip off about 1/2 inch of insulation, using a wire stripper, and twist the end into a clockwise loop with long-nose pliers. The loop must wrap at least two-thirds but no more than three-quarters of the way around the terminal screw. Hook the wire clockwise around the screw so when you tighten the screw with a screwdriver, the clockwise force of the tightening screw makes the loop wrap tighter around the screw.

    \r\n

  10. \r\n \t

  11. \r\n

    Gently push the new, wired switch back into the electrical box and screw it in place.

    \r\n

  12. \r\n \t

  13. \r\n

    Screw on the switch plate and turn on the power.

    \r\n

  14. \r\n

\r\n

Replacing three-way light switches

\r\nA tripartite substitution is a handy public toilet to control a easy from two locations, such as at the top and bottom of a stairway. If the words On and Off are n’t embossed on the throw and it ‘s one of two switches that control a individual light or receptacle, you have a tripartite switch. Seems like it should be called a bipartisan switch, justly ? The name refers to the fact that these switches have three end screws.\r\n\r\nTo replace a tripartite interchange, follow these steps : \r\n

    \r\n \t

  1. \r\n

    Turn off the power to the switch at the circuit or fuse panel.

    \r\n

  2. \r\n \t

  3. \r\n

    Unscrew and remove the switch plate; then use a voltage tester to make sure that the circuit is dead.

    \r\n

  4. \r\n \t

  5. \r\n

    Unscrew the switch from the electrical box and pull it out with the wires still attached.

    \r\n\"image0.jpg\"\r\n

    A three-way switch has at least three wires, and possibly four, depending on whether it has a ground wire. Two wires attach to brass screw terminals, which are usually at the top of the switch, and an additional wire attaches to a dark-colored (not green) screw terminal, which is usually at the bottom of the switch. Mark this third wire with a piece of tape and mark the wire on the same side of the switch directly above it with a piece of different-colored tape.

    \r\n

    The new switch may have the electrical screw connectors in slightly different locations than the switch you’re replacing. Most switches have a pair of terminals on opposite sides of the switch top and a single terminal at the bottom.

    \r\n

  6. \r\n \t

  7. \r\n

    Remove the wires from the switch.

    \r\n

  8. \r\n \t

  9. \r\n

    Attach the tagged wires to the corresponding terminals of the new switch.

    \r\n

    Alternatively, you may choose to transfer one wire at a time from the old switch to the new switch.

    \r\n

  10. \r\n \t

  11. \r\n

    If the existing switch has a green ground wire, attach the wire to the green screw terminal on the new switch or to the electrical box.

    \r\n

  12. \r\n \t

  13. \r\n

    Push the new, wired switch back into the electrical box and screw it in place.

    \r\n

  14. \r\n \t

  15. \r\n

    Screw on the switch plate and turn on the power.

    \r\n

  16. \r\n

\r\n

Replacing four-way light switches

\r\nIf the switch does n’t have the words On and Off embossed on its body and it ‘s the center switch of three switches that control a individual lighter or receptacle, it ‘s a four-way switch over. To replace a four-way switch, follow these steps : \r\n\r\n \"image0.jpg\" \r\n

    \r\n \t

  1. \r\n

    Turn off the power to the switch at the circuit panel or fuse box.

    \r\n

  2. \r\n \t

  3. \r\n

    Unscrew and remove the switch plate; then use a voltage tester to make sure that the circuit is dead.

    \r\n

  4. \r\n \t

  5. \r\n

    Unscrew the switch from the electrical box and pull it out with the wires still attached.

    \r\n

    This switch has at least four screw terminals. It may also have a fifth, ground terminal (green).

    \r\n

  6. \r\n \t

  7. \r\n

    Mark the location of the four wires with tape so that you can replace them on the new switch; then remove the wires from the switch.

    \r\n

    Alternatively, you may choose to transfer one wire at a time from the old switch to the new switch.

    \r\n

  8. \r\n \t

  9. \r\n

    Attach the wires to the corresponding terminals of the new switch.

    \r\n

    If the existing switch has a green ground wire, attach it to the green terminal on the new switch or to the electrical box.

    \r\n

  10. \r\n \t

  11. \r\n

    Push the new, wired switch back into the electrical box and screw it in place.

    \r\n

  12. \r\n \t

  13. \r\n

    Screw on the switch plate and turn on the power.

    \r\n

  14. \r\n

\r\n

Replacing light switches with a dimmer

\r\nReplacing a standard single-pole or tripartite throw with a dense switch is no different than replacing a standard switch. Remember : Dimmer switches do n’t work on most fluorescent fixtures, and low-tension light up requires limited low-tension dimmers.\r\n

Check the rating of the dimmer switch you purchase. Most dimmer switches can handle 600 watts of power. Count the number of light bulbs that the switch controls and add up the maximum wattage bulb allowed for the fixture. For example, if the switch controls a light fixture that accommodates up to two 100-watt bulbs (200 watts total) a 600-watt dimmer will have no problem, but a string of seven recessed lights could overload the dimmer.

\r\nTo replace a standard switch with a dim switch, follow these steps : \r\n

    \r\n \t

  1. \r\n

    Turn off the power to the switch at the circuit or fuse panel.

    \r\n

  2. \r\n \t

  3. \r\n

    Unscrew and remove the switch plate; then use a voltage tester to make sure that the circuit is dead.

    \r\n

  4. \r\n \t

  5. \r\n

    Unscrew the switch from the electrical box and pull it out with the wires still attached.

    \r\n

  6. \r\n \t

  7. \r\n

    Remove the wires from the old switch.

    \r\n

    Dimmer switches are usually connected to the house wiring by short lengths of wire coming out of the switch body rather than by screw terminals.

    \r\n

  8. \r\n \t

  9. \r\n

    Use the connectors (wire nuts) supplied with the fixture to attach the black wires coming out of the dimmer switch to the colored wires that were attached to the terminals on the old switch.

    \r\n\"image0.jpg\"\r\n

    First, twist the wires together, and then screw on the wire nut.

    \r\n

  10. \r\n \t

  11. \r\n

    Push the new switch back into the electrical box and screw it in place.

    \r\n

    The body of a dimmer is larger than the switch being replaced. Don’t just force it in. Often, you need to reposition or better organize the wires first to make room for it.

    \r\n

  12. \r\n \t

  13. \r\n

    Screw on the switch plate.

    \r\n

  14. \r\n \t

  15. \r\n

    Push the control knob, if there is one, onto the shaft protruding from the switch.

    \r\n

  16. \r\n \t

  17. \r\n

    Turn on the power.

    \r\n

  18. \r\n

“, ” description ” : ” Do n’t wait hours for the following available electrician — changing out a light switch is reasonably easily. Most advanced switches have screw terminals on each side with holes in the bet on to accept the end of the cable. You can easily loosen the screws on the side of the device with a criterion screwdriver ( turning counterclockwise ), but you may find getting the wires out of the spinal column of the device tricky.\r\n\r\n\r\n\r\nTo remove these wires, insert the blade of a small screwdriver into the slot under the fix into which the wire is inserted and push in as you pull the wire loose. Pushing the blade of the screwdriver into the slot releases the bag on the insert wire. here are some descriptions of each cable and where they go : \r\n

    \r\n \t

  • \r\n

    The white (neutral) wire connects to the silver screw, or you place it in the back wire hole on the same side of the device as the silver screw.

    \r\n

  • \r\n \t

  • \r\n

    The black (hot) wire goes to the brass screw or into the hole in the back of the device on the same side as the brass screw. This wire is sometimes red.

    \r\n

  • \r\n \t

  • \r\n

    The green or bare copper (ground) wire, if the device has one, attaches to the green screw terminal on the switch or to the electrical box.

    \r\n

  • \r\n

\r\n

Although plug-in connections may be more convenient, they are less reliable than those with screw terminals, so don’t use them!

\r\n\r\n

Replacing single-pole light switches

\r\nIf the switch over has On and Off embossed on its body and it ‘s the only throw that controls lights or receptacles, it ‘s a single-pole switch. To replace this kind of switch, follow these steps : \r\n

    \r\n \t

  1. \r\n

    Turn off the power to the switch at the main circuit breaker or fuse panel.

    \r\n

  2. \r\n \t

  3. \r\n

    Unscrew and remove the switch plate; then use a voltage tester to make sure that the circuit is dead.

    \r\n

  4. \r\n \t

  5. \r\n

    Unscrew the switch from the electrical box and pull it out with the wires still attached.

    \r\n\r\n

    Two or three wires will be attached to the switch: an incoming hot wire, which is black; a return wire, which carries the load to the fixture and may be black, red, or any other color except green; and sometimes a grounding wire, which is green or bare copper. There may be other wires in the box, but you are only dealing with the ones connected directly to the switch.

    \r\n

    You may find a white wire that has black tape on it connected to the switch. This tape indicates that the white wire is being used as a black or colored wire in the switch leg, so it’s not neutral.

    \r\n

  6. \r\n \t

  7. \r\n

    Compare your new switch with the one you’re replacing to find the corresponding locations for the electrical screw connectors.

    \r\n

    Because the power is off, you can match up the connectors the easy way: Instead of disconnecting all the wires at once and possibly getting confused, unscrew and connect one wire at a time.

    \r\n

  8. \r\n \t

  9. \r\n

    Attach the first wire you unscrew to the same-colored screw on the new switch as it was on the old; do the same with the second.

    \r\n

    To connect a wire to a terminal, strip off about 1/2 inch of insulation, using a wire stripper, and twist the end into a clockwise loop with long-nose pliers. The loop must wrap at least two-thirds but no more than three-quarters of the way around the terminal screw. Hook the wire clockwise around the screw so when you tighten the screw with a screwdriver, the clockwise force of the tightening screw makes the loop wrap tighter around the screw.

    \r\n

  10. \r\n \t

  11. \r\n

    Gently push the new, wired switch back into the electrical box and screw it in place.

    \r\n

  12. \r\n \t

  13. \r\n

    Screw on the switch plate and turn on the power.

    \r\n

  14. \r\n

\r\n

Replacing three-way light switches

\r\nA tripartite switch over is a handy appliance to control a light from two locations, such as at the top and bottomland of a stairway. If the words On and Off are n’t embossed on the switch and it ‘s one of two switches that control a single light or receptacle, you have a tripartite switch over. Seems like it should be called a bipartisan switch, right ? The name refers to the fact that these switches have three terminal screws.\r\n\r\nTo replace a tripartite switch, follow these steps : \r\n

    \r\n \t

  1. \r\n

    Turn off the power to the switch at the circuit or fuse panel.

    \r\n

  2. \r\n \t

  3. \r\n

    Unscrew and remove the switch plate; then use a voltage tester to make sure that the circuit is dead.

    \r\n

  4. \r\n \t

  5. \r\n

    Unscrew the switch from the electrical box and pull it out with the wires still attached.

    \r\n\r\n

    A three-way switch has at least three wires, and possibly four, depending on whether it has a ground wire. Two wires attach to brass screw terminals, which are usually at the top of the switch, and an additional wire attaches to a dark-colored (not green) screw terminal, which is usually at the bottom of the switch. Mark this third wire with a piece of tape and mark the wire on the same side of the switch directly above it with a piece of different-colored tape.

    \r\n

    The new switch may have the electrical screw connectors in slightly different locations than the switch you’re replacing. Most switches have a pair of terminals on opposite sides of the switch top and a single terminal at the bottom.

    \r\n

  6. \r\n \t

  7. \r\n

    Remove the wires from the switch.

    \r\n

  8. \r\n \t

  9. \r\n

    Attach the tagged wires to the corresponding terminals of the new switch.

    \r\n

    Alternatively, you may choose to transfer one wire at a time from the old switch to the new switch.

    \r\n

  10. \r\n \t

  11. \r\n

    If the existing switch has a green ground wire, attach the wire to the green screw terminal on the new switch or to the electrical box.

    \r\n

  12. \r\n \t

  13. \r\n

    Push the new, wired switch back into the electrical box and screw it in place.

    \r\n

  14. \r\n \t

  15. \r\n

    Screw on the switch plate and turn on the power.

    \r\n

  16. \r\n

\r\n

Replacing four-way light switches

\r\nIf the switch does n’t have the words On and Off embossed on its consistency and it ‘s the center switch of three switches that control a single light or receptacle, it ‘s a four-way switch. To replace a four-way substitution, follow these steps : \r\n\r\n\r\n

    \r\n \t

  1. \r\n

    Turn off the power to the switch at the circuit panel or fuse box.

    \r\n

  2. \r\n \t

  3. \r\n

    Unscrew and remove the switch plate; then use a voltage tester to make sure that the circuit is dead.

    \r\n

  4. \r\n \t

  5. \r\n

    Unscrew the switch from the electrical box and pull it out with the wires still attached.

    \r\n

    This switch has at least four screw terminals. It may also have a fifth, ground terminal (green).

    \r\n

  6. \r\n \t

  7. \r\n

    Mark the location of the four wires with tape so that you can replace them on the new switch; then remove the wires from the switch.

    \r\n

    Alternatively, you may choose to transfer one wire at a time from the old switch to the new switch.

    \r\n

  8. \r\n \t

  9. \r\n

    Attach the wires to the corresponding terminals of the new switch.

    \r\n

    If the existing switch has a green ground wire, attach it to the green terminal on the new switch or to the electrical box.

    \r\n

  10. \r\n \t

  11. \r\n

    Push the new, wired switch back into the electrical box and screw it in place.

    \r\n

  12. \r\n \t

  13. \r\n

    Screw on the switch plate and turn on the power.

    \r\n

  14. \r\n

\r\n

Replacing light switches with a dimmer

\r\nReplacing a standard single-pole or tripartite interchange with a dim switch is no different than replacing a standard switch. Remember : Dimmer switches do n’t work on most fluorescent fixtures, and low-tension light requires particular low-tension dimmers.\r\n

Check the rating of the dimmer switch you purchase. Most dimmer switches can handle 600 watts of power. Count the number of light bulbs that the switch controls and add up the maximum wattage bulb allowed for the fixture. For example, if the switch controls a light fixture that accommodates up to two 100-watt bulbs (200 watts total) a 600-watt dimmer will have no problem, but a string of seven recessed lights could overload the dimmer.

\r\nTo replace a standard switch with a dimmer trade, follow these steps : \r\n

    \r\n \t

  1. \r\n

    Turn off the power to the switch at the circuit or fuse panel.

    \r\n

  2. \r\n \t

  3. \r\n

    Unscrew and remove the switch plate; then use a voltage tester to make sure that the circuit is dead.

    \r\n

  4. \r\n \t

  5. \r\n

    Unscrew the switch from the electrical box and pull it out with the wires still attached.

    \r\n

  6. \r\n \t

  7. \r\n

    Remove the wires from the old switch.

    \r\n

    Dimmer switches are usually connected to the house wiring by short lengths of wire coming out of the switch body rather than by screw terminals.

    \r\n

  8. \r\n \t

  9. \r\n

    Use the connectors (wire nuts) supplied with the fixture to attach the black wires coming out of the dimmer switch to the colored wires that were attached to the terminals on the old switch.

    \r\n\r\n

    First, twist the wires together, and then screw on the wire nut.

    \r\n

  10. \r\n \t

  11. \r\n

    Push the new switch back into the electrical box and screw it in place.

    \r\n

    The body of a dimmer is larger than the switch being replaced. Don’t just force it in. Often, you need to reposition or better organize the wires first to make room for it.

    \r\n

  12. \r\n \t

  13. \r\n

    Screw on the switch plate.

    \r\n

  14. \r\n \t

  15. \r\n

    Push the control knob, if there is one, onto the shaft protruding from the switch.

    \r\n

  16. \r\n \t

  17. \r\n

    Turn on the power.

    \r\n

  18. \r\n

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Ralph R. Roberts is a master at flipping houses, earning a profit even in the deeply depressed real estate market in Metro Detroit, Michigan. He is the award-winning author of several books, including Foreclosure Investing For Dummies. Joseph Kraynak is a writer who’s contributed to several Dummies books, including Flipping Houses For Dummies, Oceans For Dummies, and Selling on Amazon For Dummies.

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How to Replace a Light Switch

Updated: 09-13-2021

Flipping Houses For Dummies

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By checking this box, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy & to receive electronic communications from Dummies.com, which may include commercialize promotions, newsworthiness and updates .Don’t wait hours for the next available electrician — changing out a light switch is fairly easy. Most modern switches have screw terminals on each side with holes in the back to accept the end of the wire. You can easily loosen the screws on the side of the device with a standard screwdriver (turning counterclockwise), but you may find getting the wires out of the back of the device tricky.image0.jpg To remove these wires, insert the blade of a small screwdriver into the slot under the hole into which the telegram is inserted and push in as you pull the telegram loose. Pushing the blade of the screwdriver into the slot releases the fascinate on the insert wire. here are some descriptions of each wire and where they go :

  • The white ( inert ) wire connects to the silver medal screw, or you place it in the back cable hole on the like side of the device as the silver sleep together .
  • The black ( hot ) electrify goes to the brass screw or into the trap in the back of the device on the same side as the administration cheat. This wire is sometimes crimson .
  • The green or publicize copper ( reason ) wire, if the device has one, attaches to the greens screw terminal on the interchange or to the electric box .

Although circuit board connections may be more commodious, they are less reliable than those with screw terminals, indeed do n’t use them !

Replacing single-pole light switches

If the switch has On and Off embossed on its body and it’s the only switch that controls lights or receptacles, it’s a single-pole switch. To replace this kind of switch, follow these steps:

  1. Turn off the might to the trade at the main circuit surf or fuse gore .
  2. Unscrew and remove the switch plate ; then use a voltage examiner to make certain that the circuit is dead .
  3. Unscrew the switch from the electric box and pull it out with the wires still attached .
    image1.jpg Two or three wires will be attached to the switch : an incoming hot wire, which is black ; a recurrence electrify, which carries the load to the repair and may be black, red, or any other semblance except green ; and sometimes a ground cable, which is green or bare copper. There may be other wires in the box, but you are merely dealing with the ones connected directly to the switch .
    You may find a white cable that has black tape on it connected to the substitution. This tape indicates that the white wire is being used as a black or tinge wire in the trade leg, so it ‘s not neutral .
  4. Compare your new trade with the one you ‘re replacing to find the correspond locations for the electric prison guard connectors .
    Because the power is murder, you can match up the connectors the easy way : alternatively of disconnecting all the wires at once and possibly getting confused, unscrew and associate one wire at a fourth dimension .
  5. Attach the first telegram you unscrew to the same-colored sleep together on the new substitution as it was on the old ; do the like with the irregular .
    To connect a telegram to a terminal, strip off about 1/2 edge of insulating material, using a wire stripper, and twist the end into a clockwise closed circuit with long-nose pliers. The coil must wrap at least two-thirds but no more than three-quarters of the way around the end screw. Hook the wire clockwise around the screw so when you tighten the screw with a screwdriver, the clockwise force of the tighten prison guard makes the loop wrap nasty around the screw .
  6. lightly push the newly, wired switch spinal column into the electric box and screw it in seat .
  7. Screw on the switch plate and flex on the world power .

Replacing three-way light switches

A three-way switch is a handy convenience to control a light from two locations, such as at the top and bottom of a staircase. If the words On and Off aren’t embossed on the switch and it’s one of two switches that control a single light or receptacle, you have a three-way switch. Seems like it should be called a two-way switch, right? The name refers to the fact that these switches have three terminal screws. To replace a tripartite switch over, follow these steps :

  1. Turn off the power to the trade at the circuit or fuse panel .
  2. Unscrew and remove the switch denture ; then use a electric potential examiner to make indisputable that the circuit is dead .
  3. Unscrew the switch from the electric corner and pull it out with the wires however attached .
    image0.jpg A tripartite switch has at least three wires, and possibly four, depending on whether it has a flat coat wire. Two wires attach to brass screw terminals, which are normally at the top of the switch, and an extra wire attaches to a dark-colored ( not green ) screw terminal, which is normally at the bottom of the switch. Mark this third wire with a piece of videotape and mark the electrify on the same english of the switch directly above it with a piece of different-colored tape .
    The new switch may have the electrical screw connectors in slenderly different locations than the switch you ‘re replacing. Most switches have a pair of terminals on reverse sides of the switch top and a unmarried terminal at the buttocks .
  4. Remove the wires from the switch .
  5. Attach the tag wires to the comparable terminals of the newfangled switch .
    alternatively, you may choose to transfer one wire at a time from the old switch to the new switch .
  6. If the existing trade has a green ground wire, attach the wire to the green screw terminal on the fresh switch over or to the electric box .
  7. Push the new, wired switch second into the electric box and screw it in place .
  8. Screw on the switch plate and turn on the power .

Replacing four-way light switches

If the switch doesn’t have the words On and Off embossed on its body and it’s the center switch of three switches that control a single light or receptacle, it’s a four-way switch. To replace a four-way switch, follow these steps:image0.jpg

  1. Turn off the power to the switch at the circuit jury or fuse box .
  2. Unscrew and remove the switch plate ; then use a electric potential examiner to make certain that the circumference is dead .
  3. Unscrew the throw from the electric box and pull it out with the wires hush attached .
    This throw has at least four screw terminals. It may besides have a fifth, ground terminal ( green ) .
  4. Mark the location of the four wires with magnetic tape so that you can replace them on the raw trade ; then remove the wires from the switch .
    alternatively, you may choose to transfer one wire at a clock from the old trade to the newfangled switch .
  5. Attach the wires to the equate terminals of the new switch .
    If the existing switch has a park earth electrify, attach it to the green terminal on the new switch or to the electrical box .
  6. Push the fresh, wired switch back into the electric box and screw it in place .
  7. Screw on the switch plate and turn on the power .

Replacing light switches with a dimmer

Replacing a standard single-pole or three-way switch with a dimmer switch is no different than replacing a standard switch. Remember: Dimmer switches don’t work on most fluorescent fixtures, and low-voltage lighting requires special low-voltage dimmers.
Check the rat of the dim switch you purchase. Most dim switches can handle 600 watt of baron. Count the total of light bulbs that the switch controls and add up the maximum electrical power bulb allowed for the fastness. For model, if the switch controls a light fixture that accommodates up to two 100-watt bulbs ( 200 watts total ) a 600-watt dimmer will have no problem, but a string of seven recess lights could overload the black .
To replace a standard switch with a dimmer switch, follow these steps:

  1. Turn off the baron to the switch at the circumference or fuse gore .
  2. Unscrew and remove the switch plate ; then use a electric potential tester to make certain that the racing circuit is dead .
  3. Unscrew the switch from the electric box and pull it out with the wires placid attached .
  4. Remove the wires from the old switch .
    Dimmer switches are normally connected to the house cable by short lengths of wire coming out of the switch consistency rather than by cheat terminals .
  5. Use the connectors ( wire nuts ) supplied with the fixture to attach the blacken wires coming out of the dim switch to the discolor wires that were attached to the terminals on the honest-to-god substitution .
    image0.jpg first, twist the wires together, and then screw on the wire nut .
  6. Push the modern switch second into the electrical box and screw it in place .
    The body of a dim is larger than the switch over being replaced. Do n’t just force it in. Often, you need to reposition or better organize the wires first to make board for it .
  7. Screw on the trade plate .
  8. Push the control node, if there is one, onto the diaphysis protruding from the switch .
  9. turn on the baron .

About This Article

This article is from the book:

  • Flipping Houses For Dummies ,

About the book authors:

Ralph R. Roberts is a master at flipping houses, earning a profit even in the deeply depress real number estate commercialize in Metro Detroit, Michigan. He is the award-winning writer of several books, including foreclosure Investing For Dummies. Joseph Kraynak is a writer who ‘s contributed to several Dummies books, including Flipping Houses For Dummies, Oceans For Dummies, and Selling on Amazon For Dummies.

This article can be found in the category:

  • Electrical ,
  • How to Replace Ceiling Light Fixtures
  • How to Replace a Standard Switch with a Dimmer Switch
  • How to Replace a Ceiling Fixture
  • How to Install a Ceiling Fan
  • How to Reset a Circuit Breaker
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