different ways to pronounce the word “comfortable” | Antimoon Forum

different ways to pronounce the word “comfortable”

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guy
 
Sat Oct 29, 2005 9:57 am GMT

Hey, recently I realized there are many different ways to pronounce the news “ comfortable ”.

I ‘m from Arizona and I pronounce it /k_hVFft @ bl=/ and I think it ‘s the most common around here, but hera ‘s a number of early pronunciations I ‘ve encountered.

/k_hVmft @ bl=/ – My friend from Wisconsin
/k_hVmft @ `bl=/ – My friend from Canada, note that there ‘s an radius in a strange stead
/k_hVFf @ `t @ bl=/ – A dame from California

Is this a regional difference ? How do you pronounce it and tell me where you are from, excessively .

Mxsmanic
 
Sat Oct 29, 2005 11:21 am GMT
well, I ‘m from the lapp region as you, and I pronounce it like your canadian friend. so much for regional differences. I think this pronunciation is the most common one I hear, followed by the one you give for the dame from California. Your own and the Wisconsin pronunciations sound more unusual and vaguely deficient to me, whereas the California dame sounds fine, even though I do n’t normally use that pronunciation myself—I believe it is the choose pronunciation .

leper
 
Sat Oct 29, 2005 2:48 promethium GMT
I pronounce it like the Canadian as well : [ kVmft @ `bl= ]

Uriel
 
Sat Oct 29, 2005 7:46 promethium GMT
I say cumf-ter-bul. Or just “ comfortable ” .

Kirk
 
Sat Oct 29, 2005 9:23 phase modulation GMT
I say it [ “ k_hVFft @ `bl= ] and I ‘m from California. Based on Uriel ‘s spell, she says it the same means I do, assuming she besides assimilates the /mf/ to the labiodental consonant adenoidal + labiodental consonant fricative consonant jazz band [ Ff ] like I do .

Brennus
 
Sat Oct 29, 2005 10:03 prime minister GMT
I say kumf-ter-uh-bull ( with double decomposition ) and frequently hear Uriel & Kirk ‘s “ cumf-ter-bul ” evening though the “ educated ” or “ cultured ” pronunciation is truly kum-fer-tuh-bull. “ Comfy ” brings back memories of the hippie years .

Kirk
 
Sat Oct 29, 2005 10:54 autopsy GMT
< >

Haha, lovely. Well call me an uncultured and uncouth plebeian but “kum-fer-tuh-bull” actually doesn’t sound cultured to my ears but if I had to associate it with anything it has an air of affectation about it, being based on a spelling pronunciation.

If “educated” and “cultured” are important criteria for you, nearly all of my PhD-holding professors would say “cumf-ter-bul” like I do. My parents (both of whom are college-educated and then some–my dad has a doctorate) aren’t too slovenly of folk and also say “cumf-ter-bul.”

Uriel
 
Sat Oct 29, 2005 11:31 autopsy GMT

Mm. I am far besides new to be a hippie, comfortable or not. And I have no idea what my labiodentals are nasally fricatating, Kirk. ( ! ! ! ) Sounds illegal. ; )

When I hear “ com-fer-ta-bul ” I think something along the lines of “ You are trying manner excessively hard … ” But to each their own .

Travis
 
Sun Oct 30, 2005 2:48 am GMT
I pronounce “ comfortable ” as / ” thousand @ mft @ `bl=/ – > [ “ k_hV~Ff.t @ `.b5= ] or [ “ k_hV~mf.t @ `.b5= ], for the record .

Travis
 
Sun Oct 30, 2005 3:14 am GMT
> > Haha, adorable. Well call me an artless and coarse plebeian but “ kum-fer-tuh-bull ” actually does n’t sound cultured to my ears but if I had to associate it with anything it has an air of affectation about it, being based on a spell pronunciation. < < I tend to perceive it as affected, but at the same specifically tend to look down on such affectation because such individuals are trying to be “ discipline ”, when what they think of as “ right ” is *not* even the traditionally prescriptivist “ chastise ” shape. consequently, I view it as even worse than if they were just insisting on prescriptive “ correctness ” alone. > > If “ educated ” and “ cultured ” are important criteria for you, closely all of my PhD-holding professors would say “ cumf-ter-bul ” like I do. My parents ( both of whom are college-educated and then some — my dad has a doctor’s degree ) are n’t besides frowsy of family and besides say “ cumf-ter-bul. ” < < Same here. such is the *only* pronunciation I am used to for “ comfortable ”, and “ kum-fer-tuh-bull ” equitable sounds plain faulty, and that the speaker is trying to hard to speak “ correctly ”, when they truly are n’t . Kirk   Sun Oct 30, 2005 10:12 am GMT < >

Almost, but we’ll let you get away with it this time 😉 Anyway, it’s just a phonological assimilation common in words /mf/ or /nf/ but I won’t bore you with the details 🙂

<>

Yup. That’s basically what I was saying, too.

<>

Yeah, that’s kind of the impression I get when I hear that pronunciation too, as it doesn’t sound natural to my ears. I suppose some people may naturally say it that way but it’s almost certainly a spelling pronunciation.

guy
 
Sun Oct 30, 2005 10:46 am GMT
Thanks for your your replies, guys : )

Kirk, I besides have /nf/ & /mf/ – > /Ff/ assimilation in my emphasis, though some people around me denied having /nf/ – > /Ff/ assimilation. I think most people assimilate /mf/ as /Ff/.

So, most of you guys have r after the thyroxine, huh ? As I said I pronouce it more like kumf-tuh-bul rather than kumf-tur-bul but maybe it ‘s because my parents ‘ accents are non-rhotic … many people say my radius good is weaker than the majority of americans.

So how widespread is /Ff/ acculturation ?

Uriel
 
Sun Oct 30, 2005 4:01 phase modulation GMT
Oh, o, I think I know what you mean, Kirk. Yes, i do that, excessively — the MF gets modified slightly.

( Hmm, immediately THAT sounds bad, besides …. )

Kirk
 
Sun Oct 30, 2005 8:44 prime minister GMT
< /Ff/ assimilation in my accent, though some people around me denied having /nf/ -> /Ff/ assimilation. I think most people assimilate /mf/ as /Ff/.>>

Yeah, me too. Some people may do it more often than others but I would find it very surprising if someone didn’t do it at all. Of course, Lazar says he doesn’t do it so I guess not everyone does it–but I do find that very surprising.

<>

Yeah I definitely always have a rhotic schwa in “comfortable” and it always comes after the /kVmft/. That’s interesting you don’t have a rhotic vowel there. Where are you (and your parents) from?

<>

Well it’s pretty common in languages that have the possibility of nasal stops /m/ and /n/ followed by a labiodentally articulated fricative. I can’t imagine it would ever be phonemically contrastive but it is a very common (almost expected) assimilation in human languages when those two sounds are next to each other. Now, that doesn’t mean it’ll happen every time–some people may have it more often when they speak informally but it even turns up in formal speech. I can certainly say something like “comfort” without using [F] but it requires deliberate effort to pronounce it [[email protected]`t] instead of [[email protected]`t], so obviously in normal speech I’m going to almost always use the latter.

Kirk
 
Sun Oct 30, 2005 8:46 promethium GMT

<

(Hmm, now THAT sounds bad, too….)>>

Haha well I guess those labiodental fricatives are just always living on the edge then eh?

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