How to make a lanyard

How to make a lanyard

ever wonder what you ‘re going to do with all of your leftover rubbish fabric and batting ? Make a lanyard, my friend ! Creating a lanyard is a immediate and easy project that allows you to use up your scraps and wear your front-runner fabrics !
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here ‘s what you ‘ll need :

  • 3″ x 36.5″ piece of fabric- if you would like for the lanyard to be longer or shorter, adjust the length, but leave the width at 3″
  • 3/4″ x 36″ piece of batting- any kind will do; if you adjusted the length of your lanyard, make the batting piece 1/2″ shorter than your fabric piece
  • lobster claw swivel clasp- you can use a variety of different types of hardware, this is just my favorite for this project. Make sure the D-ring is at least 3/4″ wide. You can find small packs at your local quilt shop, but if you want to buy in bulk, Amazon has great deals. Here is a pack of 50 for around $12.
  • sewing needle
  • thread
  • sewing machine; a quilting needle is preferred
  • scissors
  • clips- you could also use pins
  • iron

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Lets get started !
beginning, fold your fabric in half lengthways, and iron a wrinkle .
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Place your batting nibble in the fold as seen below. Leave 1/4 ” between the end of the framework and the end of your batting man. This will account for your seam allowance .
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Fold one edge of the fabric over the bat assemble so that the naked edge of framework is immediately inside of the fold .
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Iron a furrow .
then fold the other edge of the framework thus that the bleak border is now besides in the furrow. Iron in place .
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Continue down the length of your lanyard. Use clips to hold the two edges together .
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next, add your hardware to the lanyard .
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then you ‘ll want to sew the two sensitive edges of your lanyard together ( making a close up loop ). Place them justly sides together and pin in place if desired .
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crusade this seam open .
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Place your batting bet on in the concentrate of your lanyard .
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Re-iron your creases.

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Take your lanyard over to your sewing machine. Sew a wrinkle about 1/8 ” from the border of your lanyard. Move the lobster buckle as you sew around your lanyard .
Some people like to stitch back and forth to start and end their seams. I ‘ve always been a sports fan of burying my threads, alternatively. sol I like to make surely I leave adequate top thread and bobbin ribbon to do this .
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once I come back around to the start of my seam, I ‘ll go ahead and bury those threads .
To do that, gently pull on your top thread so that the bottom weave loops up. Pull on that coil to bring your penetrate screw thread to the top. then tie those two thread in a slub .
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Insert your acerate leaf near to where the knot is and have the needle come binding out of the framework about 1-2 inches away. Do not go through all layers of the lanyard .
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lightly pull on the knot so that it “ pops ” underneath the fabric. Trim the weave chase, and VOILA ! Your threads are buried !
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Continue to stitch the remaining duration of your lanyard. Once you reach where you started, stop sewing, tie a knot and bury those threads .
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repeat this process for the other edge of your lanyard .
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then, you ‘ll want to create a seam just above your lobster clasp. Stitch back and forth at the beginning and end of your seam or bury your threads .
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You did it ! Enjoy your fresh lanyard !
Brittany
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This station may contain some affiliate links meaning I may receive a little commission from each betray. Rest assured, I entirely share my favored items with you !

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Category : How To

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